Health

Sing in a choir for health

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Gareth Malone rehearsing the Trafalgar Square audience in singing part of Bizet's Carmen.
Gareth Malone rehearsing the Trafalgar Square audience in singing part of Bizet’s Carmen.

Once singing in a choir was reserved for church on Sundays but in the last few years choral singing has become more and more popular.  Gareth Malone and his series The Choir and other reality TV shows, such as the X Factor, have inspired people to find their voice and find a choir to sing in.  In fact, it is now estimated that 2.8 million people in Briton take part in a choir or singing group and many more probably sing solo in the shower, the kitchen and the car as they go about their daily business. Music is a mood influencer and we have only to look at the amount of music written over centuries to see its powerful effects.

What’s more, it has been shown that if you join a choir you will feel part of a group more quickly than many other activities.  There is something special about singing, revealed in an October 2015 research project undertaken by The Royal Society which indicates that singing may be an evolutionary development that enables human beings to bond more quickly in social situations.

Singing can even act as a pain-killer probably due to the release of endorphins and can create a feeling of well-being, especially when singing as part of a group.  The harmonious activity acts to synchronise us together and creating a beautiful sound lifts the spirits.

We hope that this will have convinced you that a choir is worthwhile joining for all its beneficial effects.  Come along and try for yourself; the Choir resumes singing in September when we shall be practising the fantastic Messiah

 

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Why Sally sings

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Quote Ralph Waldo EmersonOur lovely chairperson, Sally Laird, is a singing addict and she attends lots of choral workshops and signs up for other one-off choir performances.  She explains, in what follows, how she feels about singing and why it is so good for her and for other people.

“What a totally stunning experience it was to sing Britten’s incredible War Requiem to a full Exeter Cathedral recently. Worth every minute of committed rehearsal from all the musical forces gathered there. And of course what can one say about Marion Wood who led us all so wonderfully. Sadly her last concert with the Exeter Music Group. My goodness how we will all miss her calm, knowledgeable, witty, entertaining, charming, intelligent leadership and conducting. Exhausted afterwards but occasions like that are very good for the soul, even if the knees etc ache a bit!

Through singing in concerts like this virtually all my life I feel I’ve made a whole lot of new friends – in every voice part!

Which is why – for all the above reasons – I should like to recommend to anyone glancing at this website and wondering about joining a choir- don’t hesitate! It can change your life.

I believe belonging to one choir sort of opens the door to knowing about opportunities to do mind-blowing things in other choirs and  leads to life enhancement and enrichment and as I’ve already suggested…having the chance to get to know lovely people with similar interests and sharing experiences with them.”

Sally